Friday, June 12, 2015

Blending Calculator - pH, ABV and Carbonation

Below is some background and link to the calculator mentioned in my NHC Seminar: How to Brew, Blend and Maintain an Acid Beer . This calculator adds a few features to Mike's (Mad Fermentationist) Blending Priming Calculator.

Here is the google doc link - Blending Calculator - pH, ABV and Carbonation (EDIT - Updated 10.28.15 - Do not try to edit as you don't have permission - just download)

I have made the following changes from Mike's original work:

  • Formatted this to easily print on one page and act like a batch summary sheet
  • Added ABV calcs
  • Added component weight feature for blending
  • Added pH calcs
  • Added priming yeast calcs
  • Added bottle count feature

The calculations have been used and were found to be fairly accurate over the past year of blending and bottling beers at Council Brewing. 

P.S. It was great meeting so many of you and thanks for the great support during my talk.

10 comments:

  1. You mean to say my convoluted process of using a combination of calculators, spreadsheets and brewing software tools was inefficient? Thanks for doing this. You're good at tackling my "someday I need to" projects.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Is the mls of brett section just for documentation, or is it calculated as a substitute for or as part of total yeast needed?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, just for our documentation when adding at bottling. I have been using 1 - 2 mls of slurry per gallon for quite a while with pretty good results.

      Delete
  3. Finally have a chance to use this! Thanks for making it available. Am I right in thinking that long-term ageing in a plastic carboy doesn't count as 'barrel-aged'?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've been making more tweaks and trying to keep the link current. Use this link for the most current edition - https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3kKViCCOyVmdUlCRkN0dEhWOHM/view?usp=sharing

      You are correct that is an assumption that aged in carboys shouldn't lose their CO2 like barrels. However, that assumption also implies you aren't sampling to often and haven't had a lot of oxygen exchange. Also make sure you put the highest temperature that beer has seen after fermentation.

      Let me know how it works for you.

      Delete
    2. I've been making more tweaks and trying to keep the link current. Use this link for the most current edition - https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3kKViCCOyVmdUlCRkN0dEhWOHM/view?usp=sharing

      You are correct that is an assumption that aged in carboys shouldn't lose their CO2 like barrels. However, that assumption also implies you aren't sampling to often and haven't had a lot of oxygen exchange. Also make sure you put the highest temperature that beer has seen after fermentation.

      Let me know how it works for you.

      Delete
  4. The Ph equation for blending works for blending wines of similar pH works, is the difference bigger the deviation gets bigger. For beer it is even less accurate and especially if you want to blend a sour with a none sour (Vlaams rood/bruin). Why not use the total titratable acidity (in g/l), it scale linearly with blending and tells us more about how the sourness of a beer is perceived. The measurement is only a little bit more complex than just sticking a pH probe in the beers (stirring 10 ml beer (you can dilute) and adding drops of 0,53% NaOH solution until pH 7. 1 ml used NaOH solution stands for 1g/l acidity)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The pH equation I use takes into account the log scale and is accurate. I did not use a rule of mixtures equation like you would for gravity, TA, ABV...

      I have also checked it against actual values and been very pleased with how well it works. My initial concern was buffering issues between beers, but that hasn't really showed up.

      I'm totally on board for TA and we are starting to use that at the brewery. pH was just what I was familiar with initially.

      Thanks for the feedback.

      Delete
  5. I enjoyed reading your work. I'll come back for more

    Keep up the good work :) from TheStillery, a stuart bar in Florida

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...